Thursday, September 5, 2019

Gluten Free Risk In Everyday Life



Those who know me, love or hate me. I say that jokingly, but it's true. My life is very difficult as I'm very serious to strive for ultimate gluten-free health and protecting our legit gluten-free movement. As an ambassador for gluten-free transparency, heck, call me a trail blazer or whichever word you decide, gluten-free living is as serious as a heart attack.


If anyone tells you that adhering to any level of gluten-free lifestyle is easy or simple, they're lying and probably secretly very ill without people knowing.  If they're telling you it's an everyday challenge, but accept the lifestyle and take the bull by it's horns give them a high five and support them! I have lived it, seen it, heard it and here to help by overcoming my own demons of over 20 years of being a diagnosed Celiac. 

Support a Celiac or gluten-free lifestylist by understanding their common challenges. Oh my yes, there are everyday obstacles that never go away and repeat regularly in different forms at various times. Here is my list of everyday gluten-free risks that we must over come in order to remain healthy, in control and overcoming adversity. It's straight up and how you or someone you know can overcome gluten-free intolerances, allergies and of course, Celiac Disease. 

  • Gluten free kitchen is a safe home: I understand why most cannot have a gluten-free kitchen and I sympathize. My recommendation would be for your family, roommates or friends to show their support by eliminating gluten in the entire home. Try asking them if they can keep the home gluten-free and if they can eat gluten outside the home. This won't work for all, but gluten-free living requires a gluten-free home or your risk exponentially increases every dang day. If you can afford it, be sure to find the best gluten free replacement foods like bread, bagels, snack food and even dressings/condiments. They may even thank you.
  • Do not eat out: Too many Celiacs complain that life without socializing and eating out at restaurants is a life not worth living. How sad is this concept? That's ignorance at it's finest. I usually eat ahead of time and only snack or eat if they restaurant will guarantee a gluten-free meal. If they don't guarantee it then it's a cross contaminated kitchen with unprofessional and inexperienced chefs. Why would you risk your health for a few laughs and staying in touch? Say no. Hang out and have a beverage and get over your childish insecurities. If you do dine out, learn how to ask for Celiac safe food and if they cannot or don't understand, you better not dine out or you're asking for illness. 
  • Bring your own snacks everywhere: This is the key to a long lasting gluten-free lifestyle. There are so many fruits, veggies and home-made snacks/meals or certified / verified snacks that exist out there. Bring a backpack full of food or a cooler of deliciousness so that wherever you go you won't succumb to risk taking of cross contaminated restaurants or desperation. Meal preparation is quite attractive.  Control is awesome. Living well and smarter is how Celiacs / gluten free peeps thrive!
  • Limit your processed packaged foods: A gluten-free life need not be full of packaged foods from a pack or box in the grocery store. These foods can be saviors and delicious, but if you can't pronounce the ingredients because food has too many ingredients or a dirty nutritional label then you're on a crappy gluten-free lifestyle destined for weight gain, depression and likely malnutrition.
  • Grow your own food: Whether you own a home or rent an apartment, find out where the sun shines and plant veggies, herbs, fruits in the ground or pots. Seasonally, you can grow a small amount of food that feeds you, teaches you and saves you some cash. I'm not joking. Humans evolved by learning how to grow and find food. Don't be a lazy ass and be a smarter human being who learns and overcomes cultural ignorance. These are teachable moments for yourself, kids and adults. 
  • Teach yourself to cook: The most social and exciting task when you're on a gluten-free journey is to learn to cook and find ways to improve your kitchen gadgets. Invest in a new cutting board, cutlery, pots and pans, spices, etc. Watch some cooking videos or hire a chef to train you and friends/family on cooking techniques and meals. You can find a few minutes to invest in yourself and learn how to dice veggies, slice meats, cook fish and bake appropriately. Nobody teaches these basic things to us. Sad I know. But so true!

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