Wednesday, March 26, 2014

New FDA Nutritional Revision Leaves Out Gluten-Free Again



The folks at Fooducate have shared a draft of First Lady's Let's Move initiative to tweak the nutritional label for consumers to make better choices when they read labels. The conundrum with food labeling is that the majority of packaging is all product branding, butterflies, puppies, persuasive text, colors and other magical imagery. Of those consumers who decide to read the nutritional information, it requires intense concentration in store to do mathematics in their head to multiply serving size x info in the chart, attempt to understand what the % of daily value signifies and make an informed decision for themselves and their family. And who is making the decisions about what it all really means? There usually is hidden sugar, confusing fat data and lack of sourced ingredients to make a completely informed decision on whether this brand's product is any good or just another unhealthy snack that should only be eaten in moderation (at most).



Food Label Change
Anything stand out to you? Is it enough to help you make a wiser decision?

10 GOOD CHANGES and 7 DISASTROUS MISSES. 


INCLUDED


  1. Calories increased
  2. Serving size clarified
  3. Serving size based on package
  4. two columns of data
  5. Calories from fat gone
  6. Show added sugars
  7. Vitamin D and Potassium shown 
  8. Optional vitamin A and C 
  9. Changes to recommended daily value
  10. Layout easier to read

MISSING

  1. Front of pack is still all marketing lingo
  2. Caffeine listing should be stated
  3. Ingredient list upgraded and more transparent
  4. Country of origin no where found
  5. GMO info non existent and we should know
  6. Gluten-Free Labeling still not regulated
  7. Allergen Labeling should be prominently included

Share your voice and click below.


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Read Fooducate complete story for a more complex analysis. 


For a brief history about food labeling starting in 1862 read Food nutrition labeling